We use cookies to make this site as useful as possible. Read our cookie policy or allow cookies.

MOPAC launches Business Crime Strategy

04 September 2014

MOPAC launches Business Crime Strategy - Read more

The Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) has launched a new Business Crime Strategy to help protect London companies from crime.

The Business Crime Strategy consists of a series of new measures to combat business crime, including the growing problems of fraud and cyber-crime, while driving up confidence from businesses to report crime.

The measures include opening a new Business Resilience Centre in January 2015 to help smaller businesses protect their assets using crime prevention advice, business-to-business alerts and through the creation of cyber-security standards.

The Mayor of London will convene an annual London Business Crime Summit to track progress and share best practice supported by a quarterly panel of senior police officers and businesses chaired by the Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime.

A London Business Attitudes Survey will provide robust indicator of business confidence this will survey 6000 London businesses from the smallest traders to high retailers and the largest corporations.

A new economic crime unit run by City of London Police to better support businesses and individuals targeted by fraudsters will be set up.

Further business crime reduction partnerships will be introduced using data on business crime hotspots and MOPAC and the Metropolitan Police Service will support the establishment of public-private partnerships to tackle business crime in the top ten hot spots of recorded activity.

Predictive crime mapping will also be used to assess future business crime hotspots.

Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime, Stephen Greenhalgh, said: ‘We have to do more to tackle business crime if London is to continue to grow and thrive. Over 60 organisations have helped to shape London’s first ever strategy to give this Cinderella crime the priority it deserves.  

‘There is a renewed commitment from the Met Police to increase their enforcement capacity, but we also need a clearer picture of the problem and for businesses themselves to step forward and share intelligence about crime and work with the police to prevent them from becoming victims in the first place. Businesses operating in London need to know that crimes against them are taken seriously by the police and they will get a decent response.’

Have your say

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisements


ICSA: The Governance Institute
Saffron House, 6-10 Kirby Street, London EC1N 8TS, United Kingdom