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Joe Saxton is driver of ideas at nfpSynergy and founder. Joe works on a range of specific projects particularly those looking at impact, communications or trusteeship. He also works on the overall direction and development of nfpSynergy. Joe has co-authored reports on volunteering, mission & visions, branding and socio-economic change.

He was chair of the Institute of Fundraising till July 2008. He is currently chair of the student environment and development campaign group People & Planet. He was also the founder chair of CharityComms the professional body for not for profit communicators till February 2013

In 2006 he was named by public affairs agency AS Biss one of ten ‘Stars of tomorrow’ in politics for the next ten years, and one of only two people from the charity sector. In 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 he was voted the most influential person on UK fundraising and is the only person to be in the top ten of the poll since it started. In 2003 the Guardian named him as one of the 100 most influential people on social policy. In October 2007 and 2008 the Evening Standard named him one of the 1000 most influential people in London.  In 2009, 2010 and 2011 he was in PR Week’s 500 most influential people in the UK media and one of ten most influential people in the voluntary sector.

Before nfpSynergy, Joe Saxton was Director of Communications at the RNID, Britain’s largest charity for deaf and hard of hearing people, responsible for PR, disability consultancy, lobbying, campaigning, policy, information and membership.

He was with Brann, the world’s largest direct marketing group for five years. He co-founded the Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector marketing and is the author of ‘Its Competition, but not as we know it’ and ‘What are Charities for?’  He has an MBA from Henley Management College. His first degree is in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge.

For six years he was a trustee of the RSPCA and chair of both the Public Affairs and International committees. He has also sat on the ESRC’s communications sub-committee.